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Sensory Ethical Extravert

SEE

Discover the SEE socionic type, aka as the ESFp, take our socionics test to find your own type and get immediate feedback and insights.
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What is the SEE socionic type?

The SEE (Sensory Ethical Extrovert) is one of the 16 socionic personality types derived from Carl Jung's psychological types. The SEE is characterized by their dominant extroverted sensing (Se) function, which means they are highly attuned to their external environment and have a natural inclination towards action and sensory experiences. They are often described as energetic, adventurous, and charismatic individuals. The SEE's auxiliary function is introverted ethics (Fi), which makes them sensitive to their own values and the values of others. They have a strong sense of empathy and can easily understand and connect with people on an emotional level. This combination of Se and Fi gives the SEE a unique ability to read and respond to the emotional atmosphere around them.
SEE types are typically sociable and enjoy being the center of attention. They have a natural talent for entertaining others and often have a magnetic personality. However, they can also be impulsive and prone to taking risks without fully considering the consequences. Overall, the SEE socionic type is characterized by their lively and engaging presence, their ability to connect with others emotionally, and their desire for exciting sensory experiences.

SEE is also called ESFp in socionics

In socionics, SEE stands for Socionics Ethical Extratim - a psychological type characterized by extraverted sensing and extraverted feeling functions. On the other hand, ESFp is the corresponding MBTI type, which stands for Extraverted Sensing with Introverted Feeling. While the two acronyms describe individuals with similar cognitive functions, socionics and MBTI have some fundamental differences.

One of the key distinctions is the focus on intertype relations in socionics. Socionics emphasizes the compatibility and dynamics between different types, providing a comprehensive framework for understanding how individuals interact with and influence each other. Socionics also includes the concept of information metabolism, which describes how each type processes and responds to information. Additionally, the socionic type includes a specific model of the psyche, dividing it into different blocks and elements.

In contrast, MBTI primarily focuses on individual personality traits and preferences. It categorizes individuals into distinct types based on their preferences for extraversion/introversion, sensing/intuition, thinking/feeling, and judging/perceiving. MBTI does not delve into intertype relations or provide a detailed model of information processing. Instead, it focuses on understanding an individual's natural inclinations and tendencies.

Insights into the Sensory Ethical Extravert (SEE) type

The term "Sensory Ethical Extravert (SEE)" refers to a specific personality type that belongs to the Gamma quadra. This personality type is also classified under the EP temperament domain, which stands for Extroverted Perceivers. Additionally, within social perceptions, individuals with this personality type are often associated with the roles of a politician or an ambassador due to their natural inclination towards social interaction and diplomacy.

About Socionics

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Socionic types

EIE
Ethical
Intuitive
Extravert
IEE
Intuitive
Ethical
Extravert
LIE
Logical
Intuitive
Extravert
ILE
Intuitive
Logical
Extravert
ESE
Ethical
Sensory
Extravert
SEE
Sensory
Ethical
Extravert
LSE
Logical
Sensory
Extravert
SLE
Sensory
Logical
Extravert
EII
Ethical
Intuitive
Introvert
IEI
Intuitive
Ethical
Introvert
LII
Logical
Intuitive
Introvert
ILI
Intuitive
Logical
Introvert
ESI
Ethical
Sensory
Introvert
SEI
Sensory
Ethical
Introvert
LSI
Logical
Sensory
Introvert
SLI
Sensory
Logical
Introvert

Socionic Intertype Relations

The socionic personality types are based on Carl Jung’s theory of psychological archetypes. Each personality type has its own set of strengths, weaknesses, preferences, and tendencies — an archetype and interpersonal (or intertype) relations that rest on cognitive mutual relation, rather than "relationship". Understanding your type and how it interacts can help you in many aspects of life, from career choices to personal relationships.
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