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Socionic Intertype Relations

The socionic personality types are based on Carl Jung’s theory of psychological archetypes. Each personality type has its own set of strengths, weaknesses, preferences, and tendencies — an archetype and interpersonal (or intertype) relations that rest on cognitive mutual relation, rather than "relationship". Understanding your type and how it interacts can help you in many aspects of life, from career choices to personal relationships.
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Socionic Intertype Relations

Socionic intertype relations offer a comprehensive framework for understanding how different types interact, providing insights into compatibility, conflict, and growth opportunities.
Identity (Idn)
Both socionic types are the same and share all strengths and weaknesses. This relationship is often comfortable but can lack dynamic tension.
Activity (Act)
Types have opposite, but compatible, strengths and weaknesses. These relationships are often invigorating and full of activity but can become exhausting over time.
Mirror (Mrr)
Types share the same values but approach them from opposite perspectives. These relationships often lead to deep mutual understanding but can also result in endless debates.
Comparative (Cmp)
Types share one base function, leading to mutual understanding but also competition. These relationships can be either highly competitive or deeply understanding, depending on the situation.
Conflict (Cnf)
Types have opposite strengths and weaknesses, leading to misunderstanding and conflict. These are the most challenging relationships in Socionics and often result in mutual discomfort.
Super-Ego (Ego)
Types admire each other’s strengths but are also painfully aware of their own weaknesses. These relationships often start with mutual admiration but can end in disappointment.
Illusionary (Ill)
Types are attracted to each other’s strengths but find it hard to offer mutual support. These relationships often seem promising at first but can become frustrating over time.
Quasi-Identical (Qid)
Types share similar interests but have incompatible ways of approaching them. These relationships can be confusing as both types feel they should get along better than they actually do.
Duality (Dlt)
Types are opposite but complementary, leading to a relationship that is deeply satisfying. Considered the most fulfilling relationship in Socionics, often described as "two halves of a whole."
Semi-Duality (Sdl)
Types are similar to duals but have one conflicting dimension. These relationships are almost as fulfilling as duality but can have moments of tension.
Look-Alike (Lkl)
Types share similar strengths and weaknesses but have different values. These relationships are often comfortable but lack a deeper connection.
Benefit (Bnf)
One type, the Benefactor, offers something that the other type, the Beneficiary, admires. These relationships can be unbalanced, with the Beneficiary feeling dependent on the Benefactor.
Supervision (Sp)
One type, the Supervisor, naturally corrects the other type, the Supervisee. These relationships can be uncomfortable for the Supervisee but offer opportunities for growth.
Contrary (Cnt)
Types have strengths in each other’s area of weakness but have incompatible worldviews. These relationships can be intriguing but are often fraught with misunderstandings.
Super-Id (Sup)
One type, the Super-Ego, offers what the other type, the Id, lacks. These relationships can be fulfilling but require conscious effort from both parties.
Extinguishment (Ext)
Types are similar but have opposite focuses, leading to a relationship that can extinguish each other’s energy. These relationships can start off well but often end in mutual frustration.