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Get your Fire control specialist ASVAB Score

Becoming a fire control specialist in the US Army can be a rewarding and exciting career path for those interested in working with advanced weaponry and technology. As a fire control specialist, you will be responsible for operating and maintaining various artillery systems used in combat situations. This role requires a combination of technical skills, teamwork, and physical abilities. In this article, we will explore the steps to becoming a fire control specialist in the US Army and what the job entails.?

What does a Fire control specialist in the US Army do?

A Fire control specialist in the US Army is responsible for operating and maintaining weapons systems to ensure accuracy and precision during combat. They are responsible for calculating the distance, direction, and speed of targets using specialized equipment, communicating with other members of the team to coordinate attacks, and ensuring the safety of all personnel and equipment. In addition to their combat duties, they may also be responsible for training and supervising other soldiers in the use of weapons systems.

Military Occupation Specialty (MOS) - Fire control specialist

The code for a Fire control specialist - Military Occupation Specialty: 13J

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Minimum ASVAB Line Score

Getting a military role requires meeting a certain minimum Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) test score. Fire control specialist US Army - Minimum ASVAB Line Scores - FA:93

Requirements to get a Fire control specialist US Army position

To apply for a Fire Control Specialist role in the US Army, follow these steps: 1. Meet the eligibility requirements: Must be a US citizen or Permanent Resident, between the ages of 17-34, have a high school diploma or GED, and be in good physical and mental health. 2. Take the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) test: The score on this test determines eligibility for certain jobs in the US Army, including the Fire Control Specialist role. 3. Contact a recruiter: Find a local recruiter through the US Army Recruiting website or by contacting a nearby Army Recruiting Station. 4. Complete the application process: This typically includes filling out an online application, providing personal information and education history, and taking a medical examination. 5. Attend Basic Combat Training and Advanced Individual Training: These training programs are mandatory for all recruits and provide the necessary skills and knowledge for the Fire Control Specialist role. To increase your chances of getting recruited for a Fire Control Specialist role, consider: - Improving your ASVAB score by studying and taking practice tests. - Demonstrating a strong interest in the Fire Control Specialist role during the application process. - Meeting physical fitness standards and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. - Seeking additional education or experience in related fields, such as electronics or engineering.

US military careers websites

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US Marine Corps careers website
US Coast Guard careers website

Key skills and competencies

Useful skills and competencies required for the role of Fire control specialist in the US Army include strong communication skills, attention to detail, problem-solving abilities, and physical fitness. Candidates must also have knowledge of various electronic equipment and computer systems used in fire control operations.

Equipment and weapons used by a Fire control specialist

The Fire control specialist in the US Army works with a range of advanced equipment and weapons, including radar, lasers, and missile systems. They must be trained in the use of these technologies and maintain them regularly to ensure they are functioning properly.

How long does it take to become a Fire control specialist in the US Army

Becoming a Fire control specialist in the US Army typically takes around 10 weeks of basic training followed by 17 weeks of advanced individual training. During this time, soldiers will receive extensive classroom and hands-on training to develop the necessary skills and knowledge for the role. After completing training, soldiers will continue to receive ongoing education and training to stay up-to-date on new technologies and techniques.

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